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Laura Stacey Wants Olympic Gold for Country and the King

Laura Stacey is very much aware of her pedigree. That’s why she would like nothing more than to bring home the gold for Canada and add another page to the King Clancy legend.

Stacey

Jess Bazal/CWHL

Stacey is already paying tribute to her Hall of Famer grandfather by wearing the number of King Clancy, who wore No. 7 while playing as defenseman for the Ottawa Senators and Toronto Maple leafs.

The 23-year-old has never known her grandfather who died eight years before her mother give birth to her. But she knows the family tradition, and she’s hell bent on keeping it alive.

She said it’s an honor to wear King Clancy’s number because it’s a bond she shares with her grandfather. Stacey said that she didn’t specifically asked for that number for the Canadian hockey team but conscious of history, they offered it to her.

Stacey

Doug Austin

“I jumped at the opportunity, and I’m really happy I get to wear it, not only for myself but my family, too,” Stacey added.

Ottawa, led by King Stacey, won the Stanley Cup both in 1923 and in 1927. He was shipped to Toronto afterwards where he won his third Stanley trophy five years later. He finally hung the uniform in 1936 and became the coach for the Maple Leafs.

It’s a good thing that Laura is a Maple Leafs fan herself, and that’s a thing she shares with her grandfather as well.

Now, Stacey has a bigger responsibility as a member of the national team. She will have a chance to help Canada get its fifth consecutive gold medal in hockey. She will also have been the first in the family to bring home a gold. King Stacey did not achieve that feat, and her uncle Terry, who was a member of the 1964 Winter Games, did not do it as the team at that time only finished fourth overall.

Stacey

Canadian Olympic Committee

“He created an unbelievable legacy for our family that’s never going to be forgotten, and I only hope that I can do as much as I can to fulfill that and make him proud,” she said.

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